Googlebinge from “Ode to Youth” to “Big Daddy Paper Doll”

I don’t know about you, but I make lists of things I don’t know (from reading the FT or whatever) and when I have enough, I go on a google binge.  Here is the latest…

Adam Mickiewicz 1820 Ode to Youth
Martin Amis’ notion of “species shame”
1975 article by Steven Kerr folly of rewarding A while hoping for B
Osram 1924 treaty signed in Geneva re limiting lifespan of specific products
Antony Fisher battery chicken-farming
Ed Diener – research on happiness. Community and social support, having moral rules to guide our action sand a sense of purpose
Leon Redler
Gregory Bateson warning at 1967 Dialectics of Liberation about build up of CO2!?
Mark de Rond, a researcher at Cambridge University’s Judge Business School, examined a series of scientific breakthroughs
Felo de se
Conrad “The fascination of the abomination”
May Stevens Big Daddy Paper Doll 1970

Adam Mickiewicz 1820 Ode to Youth

The theme of the poem is the duties and rights of the youth in the service of an overarching, higher ideal.[2] The youth are said to have a moral obligation to take action.[3] Michael Ferber describes it as “unabashedly Schillerian in inspiration”, and notes that the poem “deftly exploits neo-Classicist poetics in order to subvert the discourse that engendered them.”[4] The poem has also been described as a manifesto of the secret student organization, the Philomaths, to which Mickiewicz belonged at that time.[5]

Martin Amis’ notion of “species shame”.  Writing a week after 9/11

Our best destiny, as planetary cohabitants, is the development of what has been called “species consciousness” – something over and above nationalisms, blocs, religions, ethnicities. During this week of incredulous misery, I have been trying to apply such a consciousness, and such a sensibility. Thinking of the victims, the perpetrators, and the near future, I felt species grief, then species shame, then species fear.

1975 article by Steven Kerr folly of rewarding A while hoping for B (Academy of Management Journal Dec 1975)

“Whether dealing with monkeys, rats, or human beings, it is hardly controversial to state that most organisms seek information concerning what activities are rewarded, and then seek to do (or at least pretend to do) those things, often to the virtual exclusion of activities not rewarded. The extent to which this occurs of course will depend on the perceived attractiveness of the rewards offered, but neither operant nor expectancy theorists would quarrel with the essence of this notion.”

Osram 1924 treaty signed in Geneva re limiting lifespan of specific products

The Phoebus cartel was a cartel of, among others, Osram, Philips, and General Electric[1] from December 23, 1924 until 1939 that existed to control the manufacture and sale of light bulbs.

The cartel is an important step in the history of the global economy because it engaged in large-scale planned obsolescence. It reduced competition in the light bulb industry for almost twenty years, and has been accused of preventing technological advances that would have produced longer-lasting light bulbs. Phoebus was a Swiss corporation named “Phoebus S.A. Compagnie Industrielle pour le Développement de l’Éclairage”.

Antony Fisher battery chicken-farming who set up the IEA and a bunch of other extreme neo-liberal thinktanks. How did I not know about this guy?!  Here, here, here and here.  Was he the inspiration for Jonathan Coe in ‘What a Carve Up’?
Ed Diener – research on happiness. Community and social support, having moral rules to guide our action sand a sense of purpose

Edward Diener (born 1946) is an American psychologist, professor, and author. He is noted for his research over the past twenty-five years[1][2][3] on happiness — the measurement of well-being; temperament and personality influences on well-being; theories of well-being; income and well-being; and cultural influences on well-being.[4] As shown on Google Scholar as of January 2015, Diener’s publications have been cited over 98,000 times.

Leon Redler

Leon Redler is a doctor of medicine, a psychiatrist, a psychotherapist, and teacher of the Alexander Technique.

He was a part of the experiment in radical psychiatry at Kingsley Hall between 1965 and 1970, along with other members of the Philadelphia Association including R. D. Laing and Joseph Berke.[1]

In 1970 he co-founded the Philadelphia Association Communities, featured in Peter Robinson’s film, ‘Asylum’ (1972).[2][3]

In 1967, with Joseph Berke, David Cooper and others he set up The Congress on the Dialectics of Liberation, which was held at the Roundhouse in London from 15 July to 30 July 1967 .[4]

Redler was the second Chair of the Philadelphia Association and continues teaching on its Introductory Course and Psychotherapy Training Faculty. His book Just Listening deconstructs therapeutic practice. Redler is a student and practitioner of the Alexander Technique, Dzogchen, grandfather-hood, music, t’ai chi, yoga and zen.

Gregory Bateson warning at 1967 Dialectics of Liberation about build up of CO2!? Yup.  [Mead was at it too – see 1975 Fogarty conference…]

“This year I’ve been impressed by Gregory Bateson, talking about the scientifical apocalyptic aspect of the anxiety syndrome that we’re suffering from. He said: Given the present rate of infusion of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the mammalian-human aspect of the planet had a half-life of 10-30 years because in that time the carbon dioxide layer over the atmosphere (which apparently is opaque) admits heat but doesn’t let it bounce out; so, given the present build-up of this gas over the surface, a temperature rise of 5 degrees is possible.”

Mark de Rond, a researcher at Cambridge University’s Judge Business School, examined a series of scientific breakthroughs

Maybe this?  Or that’s just the HBR pop-version?

Felo de se

Felo de se, Latin for “felon of himself”, is an archaic legal term meaning suicide. In early English common law, an adult who committed suicide was literally a felon, and the crime was punishable by forfeiture of property to the king and what was considered a shameful burial – typically with a stake through his heart and with a burial at a crossroad. Burials for felo de se typically took place at night, with no mourners or clergy present, and the location was often kept a secret by the authorities

Conrad “The fascination of the abomination”. From The Heart of Darkness…

Here and there a military camp lost in a wilderness, like a needle in a bundle of hay–cold, fog, tempests, disease, exile, and death,– death skulking in the air, in the water, in the bush. They must have been dying like flies here. Oh yes–he did it. Did it very well, too, no doubt, and without thinking much about it either, except afterwards to brag of what he had gone through in his time, perhaps. They were men enough to face the darkness. And perhaps he was cheered by keeping his eye on a chance of promotion to the fleet at Ravenna by-and-by, if he had good friends in Rome and survived the awful climate. Or think of a decent young citizen in a toga–perhaps too much dice, you know–coming out here in the train of some prefect, or tax-gatherer, or trader even, to mend his fortunes. Land in a swamp, march through the woods, and in some inland post feel the savagery, the utter savagery, had closed round him,– all that mysterious life of the wilderness that stirs in the forest, in the jungles, in the hearts of wild men. There’s no initiation either into such mysteries. He has to live in the midst of the incomprehensible, which is also detestable. And it has a fascination, too, that goes to work upon him. The fascination of the abomination–you know. Imagine the growing regrets, the longing to escape, the powerless disgust, the surrender, the hate.”

May Stevens Big Daddy Paper Doll 1970. Brooklyn Museum

May Stevens has been a committed political activist throughout her long career. Her Big Daddy series began in response to her disappointment and anger over the Vietnam War. For Stevens, Big Daddy takes on aspects of both the personal and the political. Based on a portrait of her resolutely patriotic father, the obviously male figure is also reminiscent of President Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919). Here, the figure’s bullet-shaped head exaggerates his phallic power and capacity for violence. However, by depicting him as a paper doll, to be dressed up as an executioner, decorated soldier, policeman, or butcher, Stevens ultimately strips Big Daddy of his patriarchal command.

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