The tyranny of small decisions…

A transformational change in Australia’s assessment of cumulative impacts is required, including the comprehensive assessment of the direct and indirect impacts of coal mining, if the Reef is not to suffer from the “tyranny of small decisions.” As described by Odum (1982), this phenomenon involves a big decision arising post hoc from an accretion of small decisions, without the central question being addressed directly (in this case, how to maintain the values of the Reef) and without constraints or guidance from an effective high-level authority.

(Grech et al. 2016: 205)

Grech, A., Pressey, R. and Day,J. 2016.  Coal, Cumulative Impacts, and the Great Barrier Reef. Conservation Letters, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 200–207 doi: 10.1111/conl.12208

My first actual academic article?! On hostility to renewable energy…

This one started life as a “Conversation” article (never published) and was expanded into a perspectives piece for the journal Energy Research & Social Science.

Many thanks to the editor, the peer reviewer and to Sarah “The Wife” Irving and Joe Blakey for their careful proof-reading.
Whoop!!

Wind beneath their contempt: Why Australian policymakers oppose solar and wind energy”

The following link is live until the end of May 2017.

https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1Us7g7tZ6ZfVMD

PS To the person who said last year that  I lacked academic independence: “how you like them apples?”

On anxiety, social class and who feels comfortable at “top-down” meetings

On anxiety, social class and who feels comfortable at “top-down” meetings

Published on 15 Dec 2013

Some not quite fully thought through speculations. As well as social class, of course, there’s gender, ethnicity, age, ideology to put into the mix. But as an initial stab at answering the question “why are people content to continue with formats that encourage and enforce passivity, even when they proclaim the importance of activity and participation?”, then it will do. For now.